Health Talk, Bipolar: 13 July 2019

Health Talk, Bipolar: 13 July 2019



even I was lagging at the Chopra wake the other called my critics they called me Mel Collins I have bipolar type 2 bipolar I wake up in the morning and I take antidepressants I take two tablets that they are lose that job that day I was I get that bipolar maybe was strong that I did day my sleeping pattern was disturbed and I was aggressive his moody lunch and I just wanted to be alone at times affect that I'm able to eat again like normally I'm able to sleep again my my moods are in check they stable I come to the World Health Organization bipolar disorder affects 60 million people worldwide and is the sixth leading cause of disability in the world and near a dorm according to the depression and anxiety support group or Sadek three to four percent of South Africans have bipolar disorder a previously known as manic depressive illness bipolar disorder is an illness that causes severe mood swings from manic highs to deep depression and in the process work school family and social life is often disrupted now do you worry that perhaps someone close to you may be suffering from this disorder or that you yourself may be at rest what stay tuned because as July's mental illness Awareness Month today we discussed bipolar mood disorder we'll be joined in studio by two clinical psychologists one representing Sadek and a bipolar coach who'll share her story with us on the impact that bipolar has had on her life and the people around as always be part of the show basket in the front on some questions or simply just sharing your views with us in the number to call in that case is John is back seven one four five eight six one four five eight double seven you can also tweet us at SABC he'll talk or simply interact with us on our Facebook page SABC he'll talk so sit back relax and learn from this bumper show coming to just after shortly I'm dr. selamat element this is our talk you would like that I do without this you too savory I do it you do it I do it and what do they say Cesco taste the care okay stop times have changed and you deserve a juice that's 100% fruit no added sugar no preservatives he's in a world filled with fake nothing's more precious than real once you join the box in Japan sign up for upgrade as an empty in store for a chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip get a massive 23 gigs plus 1000 all in 8 minutes for only 5 7 9 per month on a 24 month empty and made for business awesome only plan and keep your business ahead of the pack connect with this exclusive business deal and you'll score either a bonus smartphone of your choice tablet or jabber speaker at no extra cost to grow your business we've got you Booker MTN s ABC News continues to gauge our democracy throughout 2019 by highlighting the successes failures and challenges democracy gauge is back on sa today every Tuesday from 5:30 to 6:00 p.m. it's 25 years in review all aspects of the South African Democratic experience and use remain in the heart the story is ABC news independent impartial but let slim tetra joins us now live M and s attorneys were mandated to conduct these reports and investigations what sort of processes did they follow pictorial scientists in order to investigate these transactions black suits tell us more about this the concept of slack suits which is a litigation of have used our big companies to silence critics we and civil society won't stand for this kind of intimidation and harassment if you come to South Africa you need to obey the obligations that you have in terms of the laws of this country including environmental laws mom New Year Satara from deep flow Township north of Johannesburg has been living with bipolar since 1979 since then I was taking with life my I helped by my grandmother my grandmother was looking after me after Petelin with her condition for years she was later hospitalized and diagnosed with bipolar they took initial service hours better I don't know how many things I didn't sleep at 10 hospital after that they took me to Vasco piece hospital there to where they found me they died bipolar on her way to the mental health institution one of her drivers insinuated that mumsy Tony might be bewitched only traveled retreat let's go peaceful most Newton visa I hear them I turn my merry transporta the men of my tribe our say to me they talking about me they say this lady is not sick he gets a present maybe like GT badly people move while continuing living her life mom see Tony fell pregnant at the age of 24 after giving birth her condition was in due to the lack of support from the father after I deliver my baby no big problem are you father of my baby ran away first 40 years later her son seems not to understand her condition that she always fights with him having with my son too much it's give me a stress besides of my condition it gives me more stress because he wanted me true and to understand him he doesn't want to understand each one you want me to tell me what massager unfortunately she later lost her job due to her condition the day I lose the job that day I was I get that but my bipolar maybe was strong that I did they tried somebody to help because the tourist is like as the same as somebody as the other one as the other nobody coming I want to help and she said to me no Tessa I talk to Tessa Tessa I'm going to talk to people even Israeli there's nothing I can do because I'm dying treatment and support is essential for recovery and mumsy Torah has been taking her treatment but she doesn't get much support from her family difficult day because we're fightin a fight with my siblings and fetch of my favorite you understand all right so to understand this condition a lot better you know it's a great pleasure to welcome our guests for today the first one is to ban Chaka the run is a clinical psychologist in private practice out in Pretoria prime killing woke up to have talked once again thank you very much all right and then of course we have Cassandra Govender who's also a tilaka psychologist representing the South African depression and anxiety group welcome to hell talk and last but not least we have Samantha Smith who is an author and a bipolar coach welcome to have talk thank you so much all right so let's have an open discussion yeah I bought this perfect let's start with you Tara um you know people often confuse these things that's bipolar this depression what is bipolar in simple terms I suppose in simple terms we are talking about a mood disorder and that's characterized by manic episodes and depressive episode to varying degrees so you can have bipolar 1 and bipolar – when you turn about many campuses in bipolar one we're talking about somebody who is experiencing a specific period that a specific period or a person is experiencing persistent and abnormal and elevated mood and irritable mood or what we call an expensive mood and you find that the person then has goal-directed behavior so they are chasing goals or they have a lot of energy to pursue those things and you'd also find that people are struggling might have a decreased need for sleep they might have a flight of ideas they might engage in risky behaviors investing perhaps and business deals that are not good or sexual indiscretions the people might have a lot of ideas a flight of ideas and so one might also find that there are facts also they are functioning at work at school and other important areas of so much what you're describing is the type one yeah I said so that's the I mean it's it's a two-faced condition you it's got a high and I know you describing the high part yes yeah okay perhaps you want to take us through the low part yeah so I think there's also two types of bipolar that we can talk about so the way that it manifests the highs are a bit different in the two types but the lows looks the same so in the second type of bipolar your high may not be as goal-directed you may not have the super increasing energy but presents a lot of irritability and then you've got the second part which was obviously the deep depression and the lows so what that looks like is changes in appetite sleep concentration usually on the lower end people struggling to get out of bed feeling energy having aches and pains in their body having quite negative thoughts feeling suicidal so that all comes during the lower phase of the bipolar and we're not just talking about them and just feeling low from time to time also we're talking about stuff that impacts all your quality of life and your function 100% I mean I think the whole classification of bipolar mood disorder is that it's marked by extreme changes in the way you think the energy levels you have and your behavior and it's something that's happening over a prolonged period of time yeah yeah let's just be to Samantha Samantha first you I know that you're an author you've written a book and you will come back to the issue of your book now you've lived with bipolar for many many years just let's go back to when you were diagnosed with bipolar what sort of symptoms of we've had a description of the symptoms just now what what do you experience I think the mark testing and the marketing experience was one of the lack of sleep I stopped sleeping needing sleep I stopped eating I thought I thought this creative surge in me I started seeing connections between things it was almost like there was a sacred geometry to life I had a lot of insight and I really kind of lost a touch with reality my reality changed and morphed into new reality and you take on life but I wasn't actually aware of it yeah and I think this was the biggest problem I just went with that surge of energy and you know got myself into situations as described and how long ago is this this was 30 years ago yes okay we're gonna have a obviously a bit of a discussion around you know your Jenny that's because I'd like to know more about what's been happening over a thirty-year period because you seem to have gotten hold of well whatever you you you seem to be okay kind of yeah so how common is this condition you are suppose in males you you have about males and females it's similar I suppose the international stats would say about about six between six and twelve percent of the population in the world would have that kind of issue that's if you are talking about maybe bipolar one if we're talking about bipolar two they say about suppose about 10 12 percent of people might have that disorder and and what sort of age groups are we talking about getting effect children is it only well typical on stages from adolescence and early adulthood is when you typically start presenting or it gets activated but I think it can present at any point depending on stressors so it's the thing about mental illnesses that it can come at any point it doesn't have a typical formula but normally it will present early adolescence I think it's much harder to diagnose it in children even though it can be present much earlier than that because of other behavioral problems happening like ADHD it's difficult to kind of ascertain which one is which but it can happen earlier than that yeah how old if you don't mind asking how old were you when you're diagnosed I was diagnosed at 18 at 18 it's quite quite young yeah typical answer would be around 18 to 21 days Cassandra has said but then it can be something the answer can be late in life including in your fifties or sixties depending on the things that you experience but typically because a person is though oh I suppose forming an identity it's really difficult to diagnose a person around eighteen and one might present with a disorder like that or we might have confidence and same but that is what it is as opposed to other things so so what's the clinical course of this condition once the diagnosed what actually happens alright so once you've been diagnosed I suppose then you need to go into a process of one thing to mention actually around why 18 may also be all young adulthood is why it typically presents then is because that is I think the biggest area of change so you're leaving school you're going into a new environment you're trying to find yourself in the world in many different ways so I think that extra pressure on top of everything else is what I think maybe pushes it over the edge but then following that once you've been diagnosed I think you need to figure out firstly how to get chemically stable because when you're looking at treatment the area's involved this is a genetic biochemical and psychological disorder all of those factors contribute to its development they for all of those factors need to be targeted when you're treating it and when it spans spans out yeah and just to add to what she's saying so sometimes so most people you find that perhaps oh they might present perhaps with depression if we are talking bipolar – with the depression and because then we are watching our Tiff's then there's a manic episode and how severe that is so it would be somebody presenting – perhaps with a depression and then it moves on to perhaps a manic episode and then then we can have their diagnosis and so then it continues if a person doesn't get treatment that it can worsen in that direction usually lifelong where people then just learn to to to to to to manage it the the the other thing is that what Samantha has also said some people you will find that they don't have I suppose the insight into what's happening so when they are having suppose that the highs they might not know so other people might comment about it they might not know it themselves so so sometimes it's difficult for the person to say when is it that they have until they have them my present within the depressive symptoms okay so now I'm gonna speak to you in a while cuz I'd like to know more about what what you do as a bipolar coach I believe we've just got one of two treats that have come through and we'll just try and go through these sit says working to destigmatize mental illness is necessary at all levels but unless you're actively advocating for scary illnesses that is bipolar BPD schizophrenia just as passionately as depression anxiety you're still creating a box around what symptoms and conditions are acceptable alright so time for a quick break when we come back we continue our discussion on different and bipolar disorder at least evidence it is estimated that about 85% of jobs that will exist in 2030 haven't been created yet on network don't shy away from having these conversations nothing wrong with wanting to be a doctor nothing on you wanting to be a lawyer but you're talking digital skills we do coding you do computer literacy beyond what you know here's what else you can actually look into as a carrier if South Africa invent pop the new intake you know it can be the next China be a part of our networks Saturdays at 8:30 p.m. stigma is the negative way of looking at things it doesn't make me angry it just makes me motivated more that I know about these things and I live in the community that's all this is a chance to to educate people and be the voice and there are a lot of mental illness cases and because of the stigma people don't want to come out and be like okay I love with this illness I mean a lot of people do live with this illness and it's apparent it's it's reality so today we're gonna be talking about mental health awareness our focal point is gonna be bipolar mood disorder witches and illness I'm living with so what kind of medication do I take I take antipsychotics and antidepressants so the antidepressants keep my mood level stabilized then antipsychotics I take full insomnia and my appetite if I don't take my medication I don't eat so much if I don't take my medication I get insomnia I take my medication every day every day in the morning and late at night I've learned that talking about it helps because I was too secretive I was suicidal at some point and so I learned that being secretive won't help me anyway at first I was afraid of the label you know people stigmatize people with mental illnesses right so I just shy away from the stigma but now I'm open about it and I talk to everybody about it so the one thing that people misunderstand this is a stigma attached to mental illnesses is that what we don't understand is attributed to witchcraft or ancestors or something like that so we need to understand that even though we don't see the mental illness but we can see the effects of the mental illnesses on the person we need to educate ourselves on these kinda Eunice's don't joke about mental illnesses you we have to like take mental illnesses as equivalent to physical illnesses we mentally ill people we don't see pity just acknowledgement and to stop the stigma that's it – stop that stigma indeed slow-talking bipolar mood disorder and with our guest table on khakha Cassandra Govinda both of them clinical psychologists and of course cement spirit who is a bipolar koechner before we we start our discussion in the second who have a caller on the line anonymous from Capetown welcome relationship for four years and people fissures within psychologists really a cultures but he won't accept his condition because he is a very proud man and because he won that fifties condition and could in theory populate his workplace it's very difficult and challenging for us and our colleges psychiatrist and myself and his partner to work around it so he takes chronic medication every morning however if he drinks on the chronic medication he's just all over the place all right well I never thank you so much for that for that call and I suppose it's a real issue we're talking about it a little earlier Jana peps comment on that yes so the idea that you know if I tell people that I have this mental illness so people struggle with sometimes accepting it because one it's sometime it's not a physical thing that a person might see but then they fix so people struggle with that too the other thing is what it means what does it mean if I have bipolar disorder mood disorder what other people trust me does it mean unreliable how are my colleagues and family members think of me and so there's this stigma about something that I suppose we don't understand or we are afraid that people might not understand it so and sometimes that causes a problem then people struggle to then get the treatment they need because what do people say and what does it mean to myself yeah cuz I'm not I suppose it it it points to the level of awareness and and how much people know about the conditions you know comment further on that yes I think it's also about how is it gonna change my life so anyone who's diagnosed with a life-changing illness goes through a phase of thinking about how is this gonna change my life and what impact is are gonna have on me and do I want this so the level of denial that comes up I think is trying to accept that perhaps I can't drink as much I'm gonna have to take medication every day I'm gonna have periods where I'm going to have to consult people regularly while when well medicated or well basically when you've gone a good treatment plan it's not just medication you need in place you can still have a good quality of life but they still changes and you have to accept yeah do you just not and I still need to speak to Samantha but we have another anonymous from Victoria let's let's see anonymous from Victoria welcome hi how are you good how are you I know numerous I'm good yes I was with Julian Bay but I'm not I'm not taking any medication right yes and then my question is that close to my key my child is 18 yes and Matt and my other I need 14 years hmm all right okay I think thank you so much for that question another important one before you respond I want to hear from some to cement them as a bipolar coach what do you do I work with people who are living with the illness as a philosopher so I think there's a very intimate connection and I work on lifestyle adjustments so I find ways I use tools I'm very very practical and my tools are simple for example when you start going down and if feeling that low which could progress to a severe depression I have a tool that you can go to and with practice and was knowing that tool it automatically becomes that go-to so to avert a big drop so yeah it's an empathic approach perhaps you may also want to comment on the two anonymous collars we've had yeah well to the first call I would applaud her on her compassionate and determined approach with her partner you know just to be sensitive to the fact that one does go through denial because it's a implication of an unreliable mind which is extremely hard to live with also his concerns around disclosure workplace disclosure in South Africa is very very difficult we don't have wellness programs in place and speaking to the stigma and discrimination that the others have mentioned in terms of the second caller who is not on medication I don't know what her reasons are whether she has access to health care personally for myself I sit in the paradigm of psychiatric medication and I couldn't be living here and be well to have this discussion with our medication so perhaps to encourage her to explore that in terms of her disclosure to her children luckily there are of a later age and it's possible to have their compassionate conversation for myself my daughter so many many experiences of me having episodes of being hospitalized as a very young child and it was only at the age of eight that I started to explain that Mommy was sick with highs and lows and sometimes she was happy and sometimes she was sad but disclosure is a very very important however it should be done very carefully yeah she we seem to be having lots of anonymous callers we have another anonymous caller from the Philly state this time I named us welcome ah hi welcome I think you've heard much more ever me mmm good I you know I don't know horses but I believe myself I'm bipolar having researched economy because my expert in that illiterate thought I was bipolar because of his experiences but he's had with repeat text that was also bipolar so he thought I was bipolar and when I knew and when I researched the condition I thought that was bipolar I when it comes to my oldest is the whole movement very well and she said to me you know that should have been a second me and I talked to my daughter about it the dark about hours with them and I said to him you know I'm worried because I I think I'm bipolar and and he says to me no no you cannot be bright for life you know and and that has continued on because I I realized that I have I need with my daughter and for me to actually be okay if I have not I'm on the kind of user I mean marijuana so if I have not used I am on another level okay so I really don't know which world because I really think I do have a mental problem yeah I'm not on any medical aid and and obviously you know with our public speaking to say I'm not going to cover me for dead Universal if I could just if I could just throw in a question have you ever consulted a psychologist or a psychiatrist about you know what you worried about okay alright okay I don't know much thank you so much for your question let's let's get a response from it was just the health help health seeking behavior in men you know sometimes men we know typically do not like going to hospitals and getting help and I wanted to say that it's sometimes you feel defeated to accept that is this thing that's debilitating in any condition so sometimes that's why people struggle to deal with it I think and the second caller yeah I would be also interested in how come she what made her realized that she might have bipolar and as for telling the children I think they once we get educated once you make peace yourself is a way that you can incrementally explain it to somebody in the way that they understand you don't have to scan about you need the information to be able to to explain and then the third color I would say it would be helpful to see either psychologist or a psychiatrist attune to clarify what is that evaluate properly all right you know we're supposed to be talking about possible causes and risk factors for bipolar and I'd like us to start on that but Samantha has some if I could just come in to marijuana yes because you talk about causes yeah marijuana is a precursor to psychosis and in this country we have a very lackadaisical approach to ganja we think it's you know yeah so you know I think that's something to really look at it's a very dangerous drug and underestimated I think you're making a very good point any other possible risk factors and causes I mean you described this is a combination yeah sure I think the one substance particularly marijuana can trigger me until illness I think if you've got UNITA clothing that's important to talk about before I get your respect is if you give me just a second to respond to the core because I think I think there's two really important things I want to pick up on that call first a foreign state does not have a lot of access to care so that means waiting on waiting lists to see a psychiatrist or a psychologist my suggestion is to get on the waiting list I know that it's not ideal and that you should have more access to care but at the moment I think getting on that list however many it may be or how long go to your closest psychologist or a psychiatrist potentially you might see a psychologist faster than the psychiatrist and get an assessment because a lot of what the caller was describing it could be by pilot but it could be a number of things and it's also complicated by substance so you don't know what you're presenting with until you read through those layers so think it's important to start that process and she feels ready for it it sounds like because she wants to get help it's always better in these instances I know a lot of people seek their guide and see their GPS or when they are concerned about saying and that's great but I think that we are all trained to see things differently in different ways and it's good to have fresh eyes and to get that review so we'll face against to go through some of the okay so genetic loading is one you want to talk about if you've got a parent who's had bipolar someone in the family that increases your risk and it just means that psycho socially when a trigger happens in your environment whether it's relationship big stress big changes that you're going through it can be bought out and I think obviously there's a chemical element as well once it's been activated so not everyone has a risk factor present but some people do okay you mentioned some environmental issues as well yes so I mean we now one of the things that the literature will tell you about is people getting divorced people losing businesses being single and not having support so those things in the environment the changes that I happen in can affect one if one is not mindful mmm so another you in during the break you you had a view around you know causes and and the importance of you know causes and risk factors when you're diagnosed at birth or yeah you know I was just sharing that I think the etiology is so crucial the biochemical basis the psychological basis and stressors may be of childhood the dispositions however when bipolar 3 it's there and if you can't find out where it's coming from nonetheless it's present so when something is in the room and present you must deal with it all right okay well on that note is time for another quick break when we come back we'll continue our discussion focusing on treatment but before that we have some two treats that have just come through and we'll just try and go over them as quickly as possible teddy bear says we need to help people in this condition it is dangerous I have an experience from a classmate he'll take let's fry it bipolar or manic water and then Kailyn says I'm visually disabled and have bipolar disorder my boyfriend is HOH and has some mobility issues after just having a stroke that could get better but also could not we are both queer trans men and have been together happily for three years he's the love of my life all right well on that note time for another quick break when we come back we could enjoy discussing please stay with us trends Travel is your ultimate hookup for all things arts entertainment Travel and livestock so be sure not to miss trends travel every Saturday at 5:30 p.m. the s ABC News mobile app is your one-stop digital portal to all the music you need stay connected with the latest in breaking news watch the s ABC News Channel along with clips and live streams of all the big news events and listen to all the s ABC News radio stations live including podcasts and much more simply download the s ABC News app to your Android or iOS device from either the Play Store or the App Store s ABC news independent impartial we're explorers we always have been endlessly curious always looking for answers for new frontiers for new stories because that is who we are from scripts to screen from yelling action to taking you on a journey radio producers script writers on-air presenters news reporters sports analysts we spend late nights creating captivating storylines and earlier mornings keeping you informed educated and entertained for us it's not a job it's a calling we do this and more because you do your part is ABC TV licences made possible by you right thank you so much for staying with us if you just joined us we're talking bipolar mood disorder with our guest clinical psychologist table on track clinical psychologist Cassandra Govender and Samantha smearin who is an author and a bipolar coach perfect let's stay with you surrender and we've been discussing bipolar mood disorder and and you having lived with the condition for years I mean we know the impact that it has on social life on school life and and so on just take us through some of what you've experienced or what at least as a bipolar coach obviously you get into contact with a whole lot of other people and what sort of impact do you see we learned that you know suicide is one such possible impact here the impact is devastating it's it breaks the very fabric of your life and it's it requires a lifelong commitment to maintaining a healthy lifestyle which I believe is possible in fact I'm evidence of that my my story of over 30 years has seen me arrested institutionalized I've had probably 50 Electress of therapies electroconvulsive therapy z' i've experienced incredible mania of sort of running naked on the road deranged having hallucinations psychosis extreme suffering by the way euphoria is used as the word to describe man yet it's nothing like euphoria it's completely dysphoric it's an it's an experience of dis integrated mind and then the depths of depression really the depths where you know getting out of theaters is not a it's a small idea you know just calling to the bathroom or not managing to go to the toilet because you are just you're a broken and hopeless person suicide is a huge part of depression in fact 90% of people with depression cons consider suicide at some point and with bipolar – sitting on the mortar pesticide you can imagine when day I found myself in front of a fire in the in the mid winter and I imagined that I had a gun in my hand and I had my finger on the trigger and the gun was done by my side and I kept lifting it and then I thought about just pulling that trigger and then it would drop and I kept doing this for quite some time and then I pulled the trigger of course the gun wasn't there because I was hallucinating but it might have well been there for all our felt I just wanted an art and with suicide people went and out of hurting many of them don't actually want to die necessarily but because of this overwhelming feeling of no escape from the hopeless situation they find themselves in they reach for something but we sit with a lot of suicidal ideation a lot of thoughts I can't say not that many because of course it depends on the person but many people stay with the distorted thinking and don't necessarily come up with the plan and don't necessarily executed and of course these are overwhelming feelings do pass because nothing stays the same and moods fluctuate and change with bipolar sometimes very quickly let's take another anonymous caller this time from the Eastern Cape a no-name us welcome I just want to know PTSD bipolar is it the same bipolar might be it because of his past experiences the way if it makes me think that you might be it might be PDL me now I want to know is there a different treatment thank you alright did you get that okay no comment well I mean it can be you can add can be comorbid somebody cannot care together one is to distinguish then which one is primary so for the stratified strategist yeah so PTSD is post-traumatic stress disorder it's it's a condition that occurs after something traumatic either you saw something experienced something you know you heard about something usually related with anxiety which is something that you find with with depression depression bipolar and anxiety can Co can co-occur they are comorbid so sometimes then the one is pre predominant so we have to clarify which one is what the brother is really struggling with is it bipolar or is it more than sight and then how can this be terrified well you need to see a professional a psychologist a psychiatrist who can then assess properly that what is it that the person is struggling with and then you tell em II treatment for that to deal with the specific symptoms for for the bipolar and for the anxiety talk about treatment before we run out of time yeah Kassandra treatment principles for bipolar all right so the first thing to hold in mind is that it's chronic once it's once you have are suffering with bipolar disorder you cannot it doesn't disappear you know even with medication with a number of things it doesn't go away it's about managing it so that you can still live a meaningful life for me that includes four particular areas that you need to focus on the first is psychiatry because psychiatrists are the gateway so if you're not medically chemically stable should I say it makes anything else quite difficult to engage with it's hard to sit in therapy with someone who's manic or very very low in depression we want to shift thinking patterns but it's hard to do so when chemically we're not at the level we need to be that in itself is a very long process and has many ups and downs because finding the right kinds of medication the right system in itself brings up lots of conversations around us and it can make people quite hopeless but psychiatry is your first port of call secondly you want to go into psychology you want to look at the types of thinking has been that's been set up the type of skills around regulating emotions talking through the meaning making of what this means for you now what it means for your family the third I talked about is lifestyle stuff so our lifestyles have a severe impact for example things like smoking weed or how we if we eat healthy exercise a number of things contribute to how we can maintain our level of health in a general way that we need to talk about the last is then support I think you need a good support structure to balance all of these things and your support structure needs to understand what you're going through so treatment is kind of multidisciplinary and you need all of those pillars for a good one we're going to be talking about support later on she mentioned the issue of you know lifestyle yeah what about habit-forming drugs including alcohol yes I'm a lot of people self-medicate and so we also know that people who have been taking marijuana and alcohol can that those can offset an episode where either one is either psychotic or if they experience a manic episode or depressive episode so it's very important for people to remember that that drugs that when we take them the brain gets used to them and once we are used to them that the neuro chemicals so the neurology in our heads then causes us to reuse and reuse and then that it's very difficult to then get to a level where you are comfortable you thinking clearly we can get help because then your body needs the the substances that you've been taking the time is really flying today we have two more tweets to just go through before we go on a quick break and we're just gonna put it up Aubree says I love the statement right after angst expect only theab treatment for bipolar disorder in the book mental by James Lowe and the highlighted part says the diagnosis is a label directions for treatment and set but the whole human being the patient himself is a whole complexity of other phenomena which has to be taken into account he has to be considered as a whole exactly what you are saying is not so and ball says of that most bipolar and going on medication saved me I swear don't be ashamed of needing meds I feel so alive and happy like I can finally break through and let my real personality come out not treating for sympathy just when I help make it normal I am Who I am makes me me all right time for a quick break when we return we wrap up our discussion and talk about support for bipolar which is what if we still that Unferth you the end of the day means unpacking the day's events we recap all major news stories from around the world the African Union's decision to suspend sedan's membership was made up by the AU piece of security council it was a unanimous decision the sale will give them up to 60 days and have in-depth discussions on what's happening in our country this economy for it to grow you need people that would be working in order for them to be able to have the buying power but let's limb tetra joins us now live– M&S attorneys were mandated to conduct these reports and investigations what sort of processes did they follow we heard our families feeling that they were too pictorial scientists in order to investigate these transactions slap suits tell us more about this the concept of slap suits which is a litigation of abuse by big companies to silence critics we and civil society won't stand for this kind of intimidation and harassment if you come to South Africa you need to do obey the obligations that you have in terms of the laws of this country including environmental laws okay welcome back we just wrapping our discussion on bipolar mood disorder with our guest darwin tracker Cassandra governor clinical psychologist and cemento smearin and author and bipolar coach some other you wanted to comment on one of the tweets that were that I just wanted to comment on the fact that I'm Sam and I'm living with an illness called bipolar I am not solely bipolar I never say I am bipolar and I would encourage the world to get the semantic distinction in place because by saying I'm Sam and I'm living as an illness called bipolar it allows me to flourish in all the aspects that make me up and there's a multitude of aspects I'm not just an illness and in my work I work specifically with people in kind of demystifying this illness identification you know you don't say I am cancer so I think that kind of distinction needs to be made yeah very very important point we don't have a lot of time left let's talk support that is given to people living with bipolar firstly around the issue of treatment how do we support people that are on chronic medication sure so the first thing you want to understand is how lengthy this process can be because when you start with a doctor it may not be the doctor you stay with so you might take a while to find a doctor or practitioner that you feel comfortable with that means changing meds a lot so it means quite an up-and-down process as you go through life changes it means adjusting medication making changes so for partners to understand family members to understand and for you to understand that this chronic this chronic disease means you're going to be quite up and down and it takes time and a lot of people lose hope and default limits so they go off them because they feel it's not right for them and they've tried so it's just to keep trying as difficult as it may be because you will find the right solution for you just keep searching and for painful family members okay okay same for myself yeah before before let's just take our last caller Esther from the North Way Esther welcome one cameras a master psychology about the flu question yes I was aware for the 15 years ago I'm currently on treatment and then I was a teacher and then I was ranking cause of all these like issues their pigmentation that way graduation all these kind of things so I would like to pay to get to Samantha and then my question is my I was admitted and then also with my boy when he was 12 years old he is now anything and then you are given that we may be fortunate I was all and then I was just wanted to us there's a Coolidge's it's bipolar every time or it is caused by he's living with me he's affected because I all right thank you very much for the brilliant question Esther we've touched a little bit on it she wants to move its genetic yes if the closer to 2 to the relative so a close relative could if you're a mom you could genetically give say your child bipolar but also parenting how you parent how you live in the house that can also affect the child so we don't have enough details but it could be a bit of both can I add something there just quickly in that we think about it like your cholesterol your diabetes it runs in family lines right so you there are genes available there but there ain't only get brought out through environmental stressors and then most people wonder is it because I was raised by a mom with us illness or is it the genetics ok let's get back to that issue of support I mean you do a lot of that as you described just take us to by the way your your book and what inspired yeah this is my book it's called life interrupted a bipolar memoir I was inspired to write it because I want to be of service to other people living with bipolar it's a horrifying illness to live with you and I think as a nation the we share our stories the stronger will become and we will build that compassionate society which is really where we were all one ahead it was a a very hard process I drew a lot from writing that I had done when I was manic and depressed so it's it's quite a compelling read and that it takes you right in to the mind of a sufferer I did say that we have two authors on the panel we have another author just tell us about your book I gave weekly in one minute well I've written a book called focus and flourish start-finish and her the power we live in a society where we have a lot of distractions so we are very stretches if we don't manage ourselves or rest properly then we end up struggling emotionally and psychologically yeah all right I'll tell you what let's just go through tweets and I'll come back to see if we still have a minute at least a second or two if we can just get those tweets up Darren says I have bipolar disorder and I've been through some pretty dark times in my life standing here with my two daughters and watching their faces light up with joy reminds me why it's so important to keep going and never give it time for add a dark indeed and myself and health says one thing I've learned after all these years nothing can replace the feeling of total peace of mind try to those days when you have them very very profound statements to end this show and unfortunately that's all the time we have our two psychologists are on khakha Cassandra Govinda and Samantha's smellin who's a bipolar coach thank you so much for your contribution and do you folk at home thank you so much for watching be back with you again in a week's time my name is dr. Sara Madonna and I'm told and usually take care there's been an escalation in gang shootings in areas such as the Cape Flats well the rule of your starts disappearing through all worried who don't want another resolve there are balance we can control everything the purpose of this train ride is it purely just to get first-hand experience of what we just go through he made it very clear just now that he will not leave you shocked he is well aware of those challenges my mandate from the president is to fix this one of the questions of course speaks to the practicality of this introduction of the new Zimbabwean dollar what is it's worth even a nutshell this is I've just got a lot of a disadvantages to the people in the country at the end of the day do live appraisals industry I'm saying to you you cannot show a metal finger to a chapter

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