New Orleans Stuffed Mirlitons – Simplified Keto Stuffed Chayote | Keto Recipe

New Orleans Stuffed Mirlitons – Simplified Keto Stuffed Chayote | Keto Recipe


Welcome to keto meals and recipes dot com. This is the second recipe featuring chayote or as they are called in New Orleans and Louisiana, mirlitons, I’m really glad to be able to share this amazing New Orleans recipe which, by the way, I adapted from a fellow youtuber, and foodie, Chef Charlie Andrews, a New Orleans native. As always, when I’m inspired or adapt a recipe, I will be posting a link to the original recipe video in the description below. So please do check that out. He’s a really nice guy and I have learned so much from him. However, my version of this New Orleans Stuffed Mirlitons is slightly different than that presented by Charlie Andrews. I took a couple shortcuts and I also changed some of the ingredients to make it keto, grain-free, gluten free and, of course, I simplified it a fair bit. But I do believe I kept all the original tastes and that you will enjoy the recipe. And when it comes down, this recipe is just so absolutely amazing. These mirlitons, aka chayote, incorporate the wonderful taste of the shrimp stuffing, and with each mouthful, I’m reminded of the pleasant people we met on our family visit to New Orleans a few years ago. So, now I’ll get started and show you how to make my version of this recipe, the simplified New Orleans Stuffed Mirlitons. By the way, there’s a Louisiana version that’s just slightly different. Both are absolutely amazing. As I said, I adapted this recipe, so the macronutrient ratio for the simplified New Orleans Stuffed mirlitons is 2.1 to 1 with 11.3 grams total carbs, but don’t panic, there’s a lot of fiber: 4.9 grams of soluble fiber, 0.4 grams of insoluble fiber, resulting in 6.9 grams of net carbs per half stuffed mirliton. If you’ve seen any of my previous videos, by now, you know I always prepare my ingredients before starting to cook. And, here are most of the ingredients you will need. I will show a couple later on. The very first thing I do for this recipe is I take a large pot and fill it about two-thirds with water, and bring it to a brisk boil. And while I’m waiting, I start to prepare the ingredients. Today, I’ll begin with my chayote squash, or mirliton. If you haven’t seen my previous video, every part of this fruit is completely edible, including the soft seed and outer skin. So, you don’t need to peel anything. Some people are wondering how to choose the right mirliton or chayote and what to look for. So, take your cherry, which looks like a pear, turn it to the bottom where you find the creasing: I heard someone say it should look like Kermit’s mouth, with nothing piercing through it. Because if anything is coming out of this creased mouth looking end, that means that the seed has started to germinate, and you don’t want that. And also, the chayote should not be bruised. The texture of the surface should be smooth and the overall fruit should be firm. To prepare the chayote for cooking, all you have to do is cut it in half along the seam. Then, I like to scoop out the seed which, by the way, is edible and has a nice crunchy taste. So I just removed the seed because it’ll fall out during the cooking anyway. Now that the water is ready, I gently drop the chayote halves into the boiling water. After putting in all the chayote, cover your pot with the lid and let the water and chayote halves boil for about 30 minutes, or until you can pierce the skin with the fork, but be careful not to overcook. You still want the chayote to have some firmness. Now, while the chayote is cooking, I prepped the rest of the ingredients. I have a medium-sized bell pepper, and I’m going to use about half of it. After cutting it in half, I first removed the white fleshy skin on the inside, and then cut the green pepper into thin ribbons, and then cut the ribbons into even, very small cubes. You want to cut all of your vegetables into very small pieces because you want a balance of distribution throughout the stuffing, as well as you don’t want any of the vegetables to overpower any of the other tastes. And, as you can see, this amount of chopped green pepper will fit nicely just below the surface of my half cup measuring cup. And then set them aside for a moment. And now for the celery. I just cut the length of the stalk into three even sections, and then I cut the celery stalks into small pieces. About the same size as my green bell pepper pieces. Now, I’m taking my cooked ham, which is about a quarter inch thick, and cut the ham into long ribbons that are also quarter-inch thick. And because I want all the cubes to be the same size, I’m going to cut the ribbons into quarter inch cubes. Oh dear, I almost forgot to cube the onions. And, since lately I’ve been getting a lot of comments from people who are just learning to cook, I’m going to show you how I chopped the onion to get even pieces. First, cut the onion in half through the root end, because that helps to keep the onion together as you cut it. Then, place your hand on the surface, flat side down, and cut about quarter-inch thick slices starting from the bottom and going towards the top. You want to cut almost all the way through but not quite: You leave about a quarter inch or maybe a third of an inch from the root. And now, rotate your onion and make vertical cuts that are on a diagonal to your horizontal cuts, and make these vertical cuts about a quarter inch apart, if you can. Then, take your onion, with your thumb and baby finger hold the edges, and curl your fingers on top to hold everything firmly in place. And, with your knife, just cut through the onion and as you can see this makes for really nice even cubes. And, one of the reasons you want all your vegetables, in fact all of your ingredients, to be cut to the same size is because they’ll cook better and, in most recipes they’ll just present better. And, it doesn’t take much more effort to do it nicely and take a bit of care. Cutting the onion in this way may seem difficult, but it’s a very easy technique to master. So I hope you’ll give it a try. I also grate my garlic using a box grater. I like this method and it works well for me. And, as I said, I like to prepare everything ahead of time. So, I’m going to pre-measure my seasoning and, since I don’t have the same seasoning that Chef Charlie Andrews used, I’m simply going to use what I have on hand, today a Cajun seasoning. But sometimes I also have Creole seasoning. Then, just measure out your seasoning. I know that Cajun and Creole seasoning have a different flavor profile. So I’m going to provide you a link for the seasoning I’ll be ordering online. And, I also want to let you know that I always grind my salt to a very fine powder, and that’s because I Find that after I grind my salt to a fine powder It blends better throughout the recipe, and I don’t get pockets of more salt and other areas where the salt wasn’t distributed. I just thought I would share this tip with you. And, because I always adjust the salt to my taste, and you should to yours, I’m going to be using a stick of unsalted butter. I really don’t like cleaning and deveining shrimp. So I’m doing a little hack here and I bought pre-cleaned, pre deveined shrimp. But, as you can see, the shrimp are too big for my stuffed mirlitons. So I’m going to cut them in half. You may be thinking “Well, they’re still too big!” But remember these are raw, and whenever you cook shrimp they do shrink a bit. So, for now, just cut them in half and put them in a bowl and set the bowl aside for a moment. It’s been almost 30 minutes and my chayote are done cooking. So, it’s time to remove the halves from the water and place them on a baking sheet. And do allow your chayote to cool for about 5 minutes so that you can handle them without scorching your fingers. The next step is to scoop out the flesh and to leave about 1/8 inch or about 2 millimeter thick shell. I find that the best technique for scooping out the flesh, so that I don’t go through the skin, is to use a spoon. But, before I begin scooping using a knife, I first make a guideline cut all the way around the perimeter of the chayote. I can’t emphasize enough: when you’re scooping out, be very careful. You want the entire shell to be intact because you want the chayote to remain as a nice, solid cup without any perforations, so that all your stuffing and the flavors will stay in the chayote. Because, if you have any holes, the flavors will seep out and this is so good, you don’t want to waste any part of it. Place the scooped out chayote flesh into your mixing bowl. By the time that you’ve hollowed out all of your chayote shells, You will notice that a lot of water has come out of the flesh. Just drain and discard the water. Then, using a back of a spoon or a slotted spoon, just press on the chayote to get out as much of the water as you can. Now that that’s done, use a potato masher. Just go ahead and mash the chayote, and then set the bowl aside. Now, it’s finally time to make the stuffing. To a frying pan, add your butter and melt it over medium low heat. And, when your butter has melted, and is beginning to sizzle, add your chopped onions to the pot and sauté until the onions are beginning to become translucent. Next, add the celery, and the green bell peppers or capsicum, and the grated garlic, and stir well to combine. And, cook the vegetables over medium-low heat for about 10 minutes. And, while these vegetables are cooking stir them frequently to prevent them from scorching. This step will bring out the sweetness of all the vegetables. I would like to mention the link for the printable recipe will be available in the description below. And, also, do check out the end links. When I post those, I make recommendations that you may also like, if you like this recipe. Ok, it’s been about 10 minutes. So, it’s time to add the mashed chayote and I also add the cubes of ham. Now it’s time to sprinkle in the salt, and your Cajun or Creole seasoning, and then stir everything to combine and cook for 3 minutes so that the flavors can develop. And, the last step is to toss the shrimp pieces into your pot. The cooking time for the shrimp will vary, so all you have to do is cook the shrimp until they’re done all the way through, and as you’re cooking, stir constantly. Scrape from the bottom of the pot to ensure all the shrimp is cooked evenly and all the ingredients are well blended. This step should take only about 3 to 5 minutes. Unless you’ve got really fat shrimp. And when you see that the shrimp has been cooked through, remove from the heat and put the stuffing into a bowl. At this point, I sprinkle the whole psyllium husk, and my almond flour, and stir everything in. And, the reason for the psyllium husk and almond flour is It’ll help to absorb all the juices. Which takes the place of bread crumbs in the original recipe. But, do let the stuffing rest for a few minutes because you want the psyllium husk and almond flour to have time to absorb the moisture from the stuffing. And now, into each of my chayote shells, I use about 1/2 cup of stuffing, which I press very gently into the shell. And then, just place onto a parchment lined baking sheet. By the way, the stuffed chayote can be frozen immediately after stuffing, and before baking. And to freeze them, all you have to do is either wrap the stuffed chayotes in cling wrap and then put these wrapped chayote into a freezer bag. Or, instead of a freezer bag, you can place the stuffed chayote into a freezer safe airtight container. And, always label and date all of your containers. When you want to use your frozen chayote, place the container of chayote into the fridge overnight, so that they can thaw slowly, and then just bake as directed. Alternatively, if you’ve already baked your chayote, and you have extra, wrap them and store them in an airtight container or freezer bag, and freeze until you need it. Thaw in your fridge and then bake to reheat. These New Orleans Stuffed Mirlitons, or chayote, are an amazing prep ahead meal, and these frozen stuffed chayote will keep really well for several months. Now that all my New Orleans Stuffed Mirlitons are ready and it’s time to bake them, I almost forgot to mention place 1/2 tsp of butter in the center of the stuffing. This extra butter adds a little bit of flavor, and helps with the healthy fats. Place the tray into the preheated oven set to 350 degrees Fahrenheit or 175 degrees Celsius and bake in the middle position for about 30 minutes. And when they’re done, take the tray out of the oven and let the stuffed mirlitons cool for about 5 minutes before serving. For a complete meal, for me, I find that one serving, or half a stuffed mirliton, served with a small side salad, makes for a very filling and complete meal for me. However, I find that my husband and my boys need two halves for a complete meal, but you decide and serve yourself however much you feel is right for you. I’ve noticed over time that very few people eat seafood, one thing you really should put into your diet because of the omega-3. I hope you’ll give this great New Orleans Stuffed Mirliton recipe a try very soon. And, most of all, enjoy! Thank you very much for watching the video. And, if you’re new to my channel, please consider subscribing. Turn on your notification bell, and I love hearing from you! So, leave me comment or question and do share the recipe with a friend or family. If you like this recipe, and would like to support the channel, I have a ko-fi donation button in the description below. To everyone who has already contributed to my channel, thank you very very much. It really helps with the cost of the ingredients.

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