The Food Label and You: The 5-20 Rule Part 2

The Food Label and You: The 5-20 Rule Part 2


[music] Hey, mom, I’m home. Hey, Danny, how
was swim practice? Great.
My best time yet. But I’m hungry after
all that swimming. Oh, I bet you are. How about a cup of soup to
hold you over until dinner? What kind? Well, let’s see. We’ve got cream of
mushroom, minestrone, and healthy chicken noodle. How about healthy
chicken noodle? Oh, that’s
a good choice for you. How come? Well, it’s got the nutrients
an active guy your age needs, 28% DV of vitamin A,
and it’s a good helping of carbohydrates to boot. Plus, it’s low fat, less
than 5%, and lower in sodium, less than 20% DV. You sound like
a nutritionist, Mom. How do you know all that? It’s all right here in
the nutrition facts label. When figuring out nutrition,
remember the 5-20 rule, 5% is low, 20% high. If you want less
of a nutrient, aim for 5%. More, 20%. I get it. Coach says he wants us
to have more protein, so I should look for the
higher percentage of that. Twenty, right?
Right. Well, if I want to
win a medal next week, I better start reading. The nutrition facts
label, that is. [laughing] To review, if a food has
5% or less of the daily value of a nutrient, say less
than 5% fiber, then that food isn’t a good
source of that nutrient. Twenty percent or
more means it is. That’s the 5-20 rule. Conversely, you can
use the 5-20 rule to know what foods to limit. For instance, if you’re
trying to get less sodium, look for a food with
20% DV or less of sodium. [music] I thought I smelled
something good. We’re eating
some soup, grandpa. That sounds great. Maybe I’ll warm up
with some soup too. There are a lot
of good choices. See what you like
and I’ll make you some. Cream of mushroom, too much
saturated fat and sodium for me. Well, we all need to watch
our saturated fat and sodium. Try the healthy minestrone. It’s low fat, a good source
of fiber, and lower in sodium. Just what the doctor ordered
since I’m not getting to walk as much in this cold weather. Well, we all wish
we had Danny’s energy. But when we eat
right for our age, we all feel
a little bit younger. [laughing] Danny is very active, so he’s
looking for more carbohydrates and probably has a larger
calorie intake than gramps. On the other hand, gramps
can use a bit more protein and needs to watch his cholesterol. Here’s another example
of the 5-20 rule. These are 8-ounce glasses of
apple juice, orange juice, and tomato juice. Apple juice only has 4% of your
daily requirement of vitamin C, less than 5, so it’s
not a good source of C. OJ has more than 100%
and so does tomato juice, so they’re great sources. One glass and you’re good on
vitamin C for the entire day. But tomato juice has less than
half the calories of the other two and a lot less sugar, so
it’s a really great choice. But it’s also got
a lot more sodium, so make sure you read
the nutrition facts label. Okay, let’s review. Nutrition facts labels are your
key to calories, serving sizes, and daily values that
follow the 5-20 rule. So before you chow down, check
the calories and serving size. If it says a serving is
6 ounces like some yogurts, then the nutrients are
based on a 6-ounce cup. That means there are fewer
calories in a serving, which could be a good thing. But serving sizes
can be bad news too. For example, on something
like chips or cookies, a package may contain
more than one serving. Oo, this one has two? That means if you eat
the whole package, you’re getting two times
the calories listed. And with cereal and
pasta, okay, in real life, I eat my cereal and
pasta by the bowl-full, but on planet
nutrition facts label, it’s by the cup or
portion of the box. Make sure you check the label
to know how many calories and nutrients you’re really getting. And don’t forget the 5-20 rule. If a food has 5% or
less of a nutrient, it’s not a good source
of that nutrient. If it has 20% or more,
it is an excellent source.

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