Travel Health Tips: Insect-borne Diseases and Remedies

Travel Health Tips: Insect-borne Diseases and Remedies


Be aware. Insects are everywhere
and rarely pleasant to deal with. Infected mosquitoes in both rural and
urban areas are the culprits. These diseases result in insect-borne,
parasitic, and viral infections delivered by infected daytime and nighttime-feeding
mosquitoes and are linked to specific regions and seasons. Understanding the
proper protection against these unpleasant mosquito species within your destination
can be a lifesaver. Remember, prevention with vaccines, medications, or supplies
can help make your travel a safer and more pleasant experience. Minimizing your exposure, proper use of
repellents, and proper clothing attire can help. Take the advice of your travel
medicine specialist and your travel itinerary for which type of precautions
to take for ultimate protection. Malaria is a major health problem. An easy
way to remember your protection is, malaria bites from dusk to dawn and
other diseases bite all day long. The best news about malaria is it is
preventable. Found in 100% of tropical and subtropical countries, Passport Health
recommends medication to help you not become a statistic. While some sub-Saharan
African and tropical South American countries require evidence of yellow fever
vaccination, other countries may not. The best advice to follow to
avoid this viral disease is from your travel medicine specialist. Throughout Asia, the Japanese
encephalitis virus can be prevented with vaccination but may not be 100% effective.
Understanding this will help you remember to take advantage of the other recommended
repellents or protective measures discussed with you today. By simply
changing your patterns of behavior, you can minimize exposure to bites.
EPA-registered repellents are important. The products containing 30% to 50% DEET
and picaridin are effective for several hours, should be reapplied often to
exposed skin, and these levels of DEET are recommended by the CDC, higher
levels may be toxic, so avoid them. For increased protection, remember to
apply lotion first, then sunscreen, then repellent. Make sure each layer is fully
absorbed before applying the next product. At your accommodations, pre-treated bed
nets with Permethrin can be used. Properly treated, bed nets are effective
for several weeks. With a full line of protective supplies, Passport Health can
adequately protect you during your trip. Be sure to ask your travel medicine
specialist today for more information. Most importantly, if you feel ill during
or after your trip, contact your family physician. Be sure to tell them where
you’ve traveled, if it was a malaria zone, and what precautions you took
before and during your travels.

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