Whey Protein vs BCAAs vs EAAs. What’s The Difference

Whey Protein vs BCAAs vs EAAs. What’s The Difference


Good morning, family of fast, Matt Mosman,
the Chief Endurance Officer over at EndurElite coming at you with another episode of busting
the bull. Now, today’s topic has really gotten me, chomping
at the bit to do one because there’s a lot of controversy surrounding this topic, and
two, I know this is gonna get a bunch of people’s panties in a bunch with what I’m about ready
to say. But the topic on hand today is BCAAs or branch
chain amino acids are worthless. Also, EAAs or essential amino acids are better
than BCAAs. And then to add all this together, EAAs are
better than a whey protein. So, today we’re gonna set the record straight
and bring you the truth, if you can handle the truth, about BCAAs versus EAAs versus
whey protein. But before we get to that, is kind of funny
how some people will take the latest research, read through it, and just run with it without
fully understanding all the research that comes before it. And this is kind of what happens when this
whole big controversy came out that EAAs are better than BCAAs. One paper came out demonstrating certain things. All previous research before that was ignored
on BCAAs. And lo and behold, EAAs are better than BCAAs
all the sudden. But what a lot of these people don’t realize
is science doesn’t prove a damn thing. It just demonstrates things. If an experiment is done say on EAAs, this
experiment should be repeated multiple times, multiple times, and multiple times till we
get closer to an answer. But ultimately, nothing is ever proven by
science, is just demonstrated. So, enough about that. So today what we’re gonna do is we’re gonna
describe what BCAAs are, what EAAs are, and then what a whey protein is and then we’ll
kind of describe the benefits of each and then we’ll answer the ultimate question, is
one better than the other. So, let’s dive right into it first with BCAAs. Now, the branched-chain amino acids are leucine,
isoleucine, and valine. Now, what you need to know about BCAAs is
they are the main trigger for muscle protein synthesis or the process that promotes muscle
repair and recovery. Several research studies have demonstrated
that these BCAAs are necessary to stimulate muscle protein synthesis. And the most important part to remember about
this is leucine is the main trigger for muscle protein synthesis. And if you take a BCAA, you wanna make sure
you’re getting about 2.5 to 3.5 grams of leucine to maximally stimulate muscle protein synthesis. Now, the other BCAAs, and they’re like isoleucine,
helps to prevent the breakdown of leucine. And then the other ones can kind of help blunt
muscle fatigue, reduce muscle breakdown, and other things like that, which we’ll get into
here in a second more in-depth. So, that is branched chain amino acids or
BCAAs in a nutshell. Now, what are the EAAs? EAAs are essential amino acids, which part
of those essential amino acids are the BCAAs, leucine, isoleucine, and valine, plus five
other amino acids. Now with essential amino acids, they’re essential
because your body can’t produce them. They must be consumed through a diet. So, main things to remember about EAAs is
that they do include the BCAAs plus five other essential amino acids that cannot be produced
in the body and hence need to be either eaten through the diet or supplemented. So that is EAAs. Now, what about a whey protein, whether an
isolate or a concentrate? So with a whey protein, you are gonna get
all the BCAAs, all the EAAs, and then some conditionally essential amino acids and then
some non-essential amino acids. And this is what makes whey protein a complete
protein is because it has all the EAAs. So that’s kind of a brief look at BCAAs, EAAs,
and a whey protein. So, which one is best and is one worthless
compared to the other? And the answer is no. There’s benefits honestly to all of them. Let’s look at first BCAAs and what people
are saying EAAs are superior to be BCAAs. Like I said before, the BCAAs and especially
leucine are the main trigger for muscle protein synthesis, and it can stimulate muscle protein
synthesis as well as EAAs and here’s why. Unless you are in a completely fasted state,
your body has enough of the EAAs in its amino acid pool to be able to provide the material
per se to help with muscle protein synthesis, muscle repair when you supplement with BCAAs. So think of it like this. The EAAs provide the building material. The BCAAs provide the trigger to stimulate
muscle protein synthesis. So, BCAAs are not worthless because your body
has those available EAAs to help with muscle repair, so not worthless. Now, on to the EAAs. Essential amino acids are absolutely fine
if you wanna supplement them with two. Like I have no issue with them, but it’s kind
of the same premise of how BCAA works. Since the EAAs contain leucine, isoleucine,
and valine, it’s still gonna trigger muscle protein synthesis and you’re just adding some
more EAAs in there in a complete like EAA product that you’re still gonna have all the
building material to produce muscle repair and recovery. So that is EAAs, definitely some benefits. And then you move on to a complete whey protein. Now, compared to BCAAs and EAA supplements,
whey protein is only superior in the fact that it will prolong or increase the rate
of muscle protein synthesis for a longer period of time compared to BCAAs or EAAs. And here is why. If you were to consume an EAA only product,
some of those essential amino acids are converted into non-essential amino acids. So not as many amino acids are available to
promote muscle repair and recovery. So, I’m gonna paint out a little scenario
here as far as how you can combine all these to work together if you want to. So in order for muscle protein synthesis to
be triggered, you’re gonna wanna either eat…let’s just say in this case, you’re gonna eat a
meal containing anywhere from 20 to 30 grams of protein. This will trigger muscle protein synthesis
up to about three hours where at that point it starts to decline a little bit. Now, here’s where BCAAs or EAAs can come in. At that three hour mark when muscle protein
synthesis starts to decline, you could take either a BCAA supplement or an EAA supplement
to basically retrigger muscle protein synthesis to get it to a higher rate again before it
declines. And the point being is you can either like
eat or supplement every three to four hours to keep muscle protein synthesis elevated. It’s really up to you, like what I like to
do is obviously eat a breakfast that has 20 to 25 grams of protein with carbohydrate,
and then I’ll have a snack a little bit later that includes a carbohydrate and either a
BCAA or an EAA. I’ll have lunch again with 20 to 25 grams
of protein and then snack time again a carb with a BCAA or an EAA, and dinner, and then
maybe a protein shake at night like a casein to basically keep muscle protein synthesis
rates elevated. Now, another common kind of debate out there
is if you have adequate protein intake from your diet, BCAAs again are worthless. And that’s really not true because BCAAs serve
other functions in the body or provide other benefits especially to endurance athletes. These being is when you consume BCAAs during
endurance exercise, they can do one of three things. They can blunt muscle fatigue. It can reduce muscle protein breakdown, and
then the BCAA specifically can contribute to energy production during endurance exercise. So to say BCAAs are completely worthless when
enough protein is being consumed on a daily basis through diet is just not true. It’s a bunch of bull… Now, some of you might be saying, “Well, why
can’t I just drink a protein shake or eat a cheeseburger during endurance exercise?” I don’t know about you, but one, there’s probably
not a drive-through on your race course or during your training run or ride or whatever,
and two, I highly doubt anyone is gonna wanna eat a cheeseburger or a nice warm protein
shake during a hot and humid race that’s like three to four hours long. Come on, spare me the bullshit. So, that, in a nutshell, is BCAAs versus EAAs
versus whey protein. To sum it all up, each have their own benefits
and I can see a use from any training program as far as supplementation. At the end of the day, the whey protein is
superior just based solely on elevating the rates of muscle protein synthesis. But as you can kind of come to see from what
I said previously in this video, the BCAAs and the EAS also have their own benefit. So, right over, if you have a friend who believes
BCAAs are worthless, please share this video with them. If you want other videos like this on endurance’s
training, nutrition, and supplementation, subscribe to the EndurElite YouTube channel
or head on over to the EndurElite blog at www.endurelite.com. Get social with us on insta slam in our EndurElite
training and nutrition club Facebook page. And until next time, my endurance friends,
stay fueled, stay focused, stay fast, and don’t fall for the bullshit.

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